Secondary

Academic Departments


Biblical and Social Studies

Tyler Street Christian Academy offers theological classes throughout all of middle and high school. Students will survey both Old and New testaments, learning about how God has worked faithfully to bring about a great salvation of His children. While they will learn practical theology – how to pray, how to make wise decisions, and how to interact with those of different religious mindsets. More importantly, however, our students see all of this modelled in the lives of the faculty and staff of our school.

The Social Studies Department at Tyler Street Christian Academy is dedicated to providing students with a faith-informed discernment of major political, economic, social, and cultural developments that shape the world in which we live. Each course equips students to explore the human experience and aims to foster an understanding of world cultures. Our teachers prepare students to develop questions, formulate solutions to real world problems, and analyze the relationship between the present and the past. With a greater understanding of the world and how it works, our graduates become contributing, educated members of society.

Bible 600

Bible 600 provides a developmental and in-depth academic study of the teachings of the Old and New Testaments. It focuses on a brief survey of the Old and New Testaments, with special emphasis upon the key people, places, and events from the book of Genesis to the book of Revelation. These areas target three content strands: theology, biblical literature, and biblical background.

Bible 700

Bible 700 provides a developmental and in-depth academic study of the teachings of the Old and New Testaments. It focuses on worship, mankind, the attributes of God, prophecies about Christ, the living of balanced lives, and the book of Psalms. Special emphasis is given to the life of Christ from His pre-existence and birth to His resurrection and ascension. These areas target five content strands: theology, the attributes of God, biblical literature, Christian growth, and the life of Christ.

Bible 800

Bible 800 provides a developmental and in-depth academic study of the teachings of the Old and New Testaments. It focuses on prayer, salvation, the attributes of God, the book of Proverbs, and interpersonal relationships. Special emphasis is given to a survey of Church history from the early Church through the Reformation. These areas target five content strands: theology, the attributes of God, biblical literature, Christian growth, and Church history.

New Testament Survey

New Testament Survey provides a developmental and in-depth academic study of the teachings of the New Testament from the Intertestamental period (prior to the birth of Christ) to the book of Revelation. The survey emphasizes the most important people, places, and events in the development and expansion of the Church. The course also includes material on Christian suffering, witnessing, and the will of God. New Testament Survey targets four major strands: theology, biblical literature, biblical background, and Christian growth.

Old Testament Survey

Old Testament Survey provides a developmental and in-depth academic study of the teachings of the Old Testament, from the creation of the world (Genesis) to the restoration of Israel and the ministry of its post-exilic prophets (Malachi). The survey emphasizes the most important people, places, and events in the development and decline of the nation of Israel. These areas target three content strands: theology, biblical literature, and biblical background.

Foundations for Living

Foundations for Living is an elective for high schools students. Designed specifically with 11th and 12th graders in mind, Foundations for Living provides a Bible-based, sequential development of a Christian worldview through the use of fundamental truths from the Bible and the application of biblical principles to the various areas of contemporary life. The course aims to pull all of a student’s education together into a unified whole, preparing them for their new adventures beyond high school in the home, church, college, and society.

History and Geography 600

History and Geography 600 continues the process of developing in students an understanding of and appreciation for God’s activity as seen in the record of man and his relationships. The course focuses on World History, with an emphasis on Western Europe. Specifically, it covers World History from ancient civilizations through the end of the 20th century, highlighting early Christianity (through the Reformation) and the two World Wars. These areas of focus target three major content strands: History, Geography, and Social Studies Skills.

History and Geography 700

History and Geography 700 continues the process of developing in students an understanding of and appreciation for God’s activity as seen in the record of man and his relationships. The course surveys the social sciences, covering history, geography, anthropology, sociology, economics, and political science. These areas of focus target all five major content strands: History, Geography, Government and Citizenship, Economics, and Social Studies Skills.

History and Geography 800

History and Geography 800 continues the process of developing in students an understanding of and appreciation for God’s activity as seen in the record of man and his relationships. The course focuses on American History, covering the subject from early exploration through the present day, with special emphasis given to the Civil War and to inventions and technology of the 19th and early 20th centuries. These areas of focus target three major content strands: History, Geography, and Government and Citizenship.

American History

American History continues the process of developing in students an understanding of and appreciation for God’s activity as seen in the record of man and his relationships. The course covers early American exploration to the present day, placing special emphasis on the politics of the 18th and early 19th centuries and the Civil War. These areas of focus target three major content strands: History, Geography, and Government and Citizenship.

Government and Economics

Government and Economics continues the process of developing in students an understanding of and appreciation for God’s activity as seen in the record of man and his relationships. The course focuses on two major areas: Government, with special emphasis on American government, and Economics, with special emphasis on personal finance. These areas of focus target three major content strands: History, Government and Citizenship, and Economics.

World Geography

World Geography takes students on a journey around the world in which they will learn about the physical and human geography of various regions. They will study the history of each region and examine the political, economic, and cultural characteristics of the world in which we live. Students will also learn about the tools and technologies of geography such as globes, maps, charts, and global information systems.

World History

World History continues the process of developing in students an understanding of and appreciation for God’s activity as seen in the record of man and his relationships. With an emphasis on Western Europe, the course surveys ancient civilizations to the end of the 20th century, highlighting early Christianity (through the Reformation) and the two World Wars. These areas of focus target three major content strands: History, Geography, and Social Studies Skills

 


Foreign Language

Spanish I

Spanish I explores the Spanish language through communication, culture, connections, comparisons, and communities. Course materials are designed to support students as they work to gain a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural competency. Spanish I introduce students to the mechanics of the Spanish language, acquaints them with the cultural differences of Hispanic countries, and helps them gain a keen awareness of their own culture.

Spanish II

Spanish II builds upon skills and concepts taught in Spanish I, emphasizing communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities. Students learn to use Spanish in everyday situations in both oral and written, communication.

Spanish III

Spanish III is a project based course which challenges students to  apply the skills learned in Spanish I and Spanish II. These projects are practical in nature and are meant to strengthen the four core skills in a foreign language: listening, reading, writing, and speaking. Emphasis is placed on the application of Spanish grammar rules. Pronunciation of Spanish is also improved as students practice their speaking skills on a regular basis. In addition, projects expose students to cultures from Spanish-speaking countries all around the world.


English Language Arts

English Language Arts teachers have the distinct role of equipping the student with the integral and foundational tools necessary for success in all areas of his or her life. Since God created the world through language and because language is a God-given gift unique to humanity, members of the English department recognize the important role we serve in shaping the lives of our students. Therefore, our English curriculum targets the development of precision, clarity, and deftness of self-expression; focuses on the importance of understanding the human condition throughout time; and fosters inspiration and ability to create change through effective means of communication. Upon graduation from TSCA, our students are well prepared to communicate effectively, understand the nature of mankind, and positively transform the world.

Language 600

Language Arts 600 continues to build on the sequential development and integration of communication skills in four major areas—reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students develop reading skills like identification of main ideas, supporting details, sequence, and facts and opinions. Furthermore, students are introduced to more advanced reading skills such as analyzing propaganda, making inferences and determining the author’s authority. Students develop capacities for identifying basic elements of narrative prose and literary comprehension skills through the reading of short stories, nonfiction pieces, and poetry. In writing it gives students the opportunity to develop their abilities in writing paragraphs, business letters, poetry, and short stories, guides students through planning, organizing, writing, and revising a report.

Language 700

This course develops reading skills like identification of main ideas, supporting details, sequence and drawing logical conclusions. Students build foundations of basic literary comprehension skills through the reading of biographical and autobiographical pieces, poetry, and character analyses. Writing skills are sharpened as students write character analyses, character sketches, short biographies, and summaries. Students develop critical thinking skills through speculative writing on morality.

Language 800

Language 800 deepens students understanding through analyzing propaganda and biographies, autobiographies, formal essays, and informal essays. Students make denotative, symbolic, and connotative readings of a text. They are also introduced to both Old English and Middle English languages and literature. Students are prepared for the higher level literary comprehension skills required in the upper grades. They develop their abilities in writing business letters, friendly letters, informal essays, and basic literature analyses.

English I

English I continues to build on the sequential development and integration of communication skills in four major areas—reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Emphasis is placed on teaching students how to understand and appreciate poetry, drama, informative nonfiction, and fiction. Students analyze, evaluate, and interpret a text, which reinforces awareness of the elements and structure of narrative prose. This course also guides students through readings of drama, a novel, selections from well-known poetry, and short stories. In writing, grammar construction allows them to develop their abilities in writing speeches, short essays, poetry, friendly/business letters, and short stories.

English II

This course teaches students how to comprehend and appreciate poetry, drama, nonfiction, and fiction; how to analyze, evaluate, and interpret a text; and how to recognize the elements and structure of narrative prose. In writing, paragraph construction is developed along with writing a set of instructions, a literary critique, a poem, a short story, and a speech.

English III

English III examines the elements and structure of narrative and expository prose. Students read and analyze selections and excerpts from well-known poetry and nonfiction pieces. Writing provides practice in standard and nonstandard English, as well as specialized language use. Students also learn to write cohesive and coherent expository prose, literary critiques, personal essays, poetry, and research papers.

English IV

English IV focuses on English literature and its history from 1000-1800. Students read and analyze literary fiction-particularly the readings of Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Milton’s Paradise Lost, Beowulf, Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress, poetry, and drama (Medieval Drama and Elizabethan Drama). Students write cohesive and coherent expository prose and write literary critiques, poetry, short stories, and expository prose.


Math and Science

We desire for our students to have an appreciation of the beauty and wonder of God, through science and build strong mathematical skills for college and career readiness. Students are motivated and empowered to approach the world by incorporating critical thinking and problem solving techniques of math and science concepts in the classroom. We pair relevant technologies and methods to cultivate a spirit of inquiry and nurture curiosity.

We are committed to developing an atmosphere of high achievement by incorporating faith and learning; faith to provide a spiritual foundation and learning to develop a lifelong pattern of applying knowledge to an ever evolving technological society.

Math 600

Math 600 is a full-year math course focusing on number skills and numerical literacy, with an introduction to rational numbers and the skills needed for algebra. In it, students will gain solid experience with number theory and operations, including decimals and fractions. This course also integrates ratio relationships and proportional reasoning throughout the units, as well as introduces students to geometric and statistical concepts.

Math 700

Math 700 is designed to prepare junior-high students for Pre-Algebra. This course focuses on strengthening needed skills in problem solving, number sense, and proportional reasoning. It also introduces students to integers, equations, and geometric concepts.

Math 800

This course focuses on strengthening needed skills in problem solving, integers, equations, and graphing. Students will begin to see the “big picture” of mathematics and learn how numeric, algebraic, and geometric concepts are woven together to build a foundation for higher mathematical thinking.

Algebra I

Algebra I is a full-year, high school credit course that is intended for the student who has successfully mastered the core algebraic concepts covered in the prerequisite course, Pre-Algebra. Within the Algebra I course, the student will explore basic algebraic fundamentals such as evaluating, creating, solving and graphing linear, quadratic, and polynomial functions.

Algebra II

Algebra II is a full-year, high school math course intended for the student who has successfully completed the prerequisite course Algebra I. This course focuses on algebraic techniques and methods in order to develop student understanding of advanced number theory, concepts involving linear, quadratic and polynomial functions, and Precalculus theories. This course also integrates geometric concepts and skills throughout the units, as well as introducing students to basic trigonometric identities and problem solving.

Geometry

Geometry is a full-year, high school math course for the student who has successfully completed the prerequisite course, Algebra I. The course focuses on the skills and methods of linear, coordinate, and plane geometry. In it, students will gain solid experience with geometric calculations and coordinate plane graphing, methods of formal proof, and techniques of construction.

Precalculus

Precalculus is a full-year, high school credit course that is intended for the student who has successfully mastered the core algebraic and conceptual geometric concepts covered in the prerequisite courses: Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. The course primarily focuses on the skills and methods of analytic geometry and trigonometry while investigating further relationships in functions, probability, number theory, limits, and the introduction of derivatives.

Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus

Advanced Placement Calculus is a full-year, high school credit course that is intended for the student who has successfully mastered a minimum of four high school level mathematics courses that cover analytical and conceptual algebra (with heavy emphasis on functions), coordinate and plane geometry, and trigonometric functions. Students must successfully complete Precalculus as a prerequisite. The course primarily focuses on the skills and methods of analyzing graphical behavior of functions, the definition of a derivative as well as applications of derivatives, integration and their relationships with the graphical function.

Science 600

Science 600 is a basic intermediate course intended to expose students to the designs and patterns in God’s physical universe.  Some of the areas covered in Science 600 include the study of plant and animal systems, plant and animal behavior, genetics, the structure of matter, light and sound, kinematics, planet Earth, the solar system, and astronomy. The course seeks to develop the student’s ability to understand and participate in scientific inquiry. The units contain experiments and projects to capitalize on children’s natural curiosity. The student will explore, observe, and manipulate everyday objects and materials in their environment. Students at this level should begin to understand interrelationships between organisms, recognize patterns in ecosystems, and become aware of the cellular dimensions of living systems. Collectively, this should help students develop and build on their subject-matter knowledge base.

Science 700

Science 700 is an intermediate course intended to expose students to the designs and patterns in God’s physical universe. This course expands on the Science 600 course, providing a set of basic scientific skills and a broad survey of the major areas of science. Some of the areas covered in Science 700 include the scientific method, overview of the four major areas of science, mathematics in science, astronomy, the atmosphere, natural cycles, weather and climate, human anatomy and physiology, and careers in science. The course seeks to develop the student’s ability to be aware of and participate in scientific inquiry. The units contain experiments and projects to capitalize on the students’ natural curiosity. The student will explore, observe, and manipulate everyday objects and materials in their environment. Students at this level should show understanding of interrelationships between organisms, recognize patterns in systems, and expand their knowledge of cellular dimensions of living systems. Collectively, this should help students develop and build on their subject-matter knowledge base.

Earth Science

Earth Science explores the Earth’s structure, interacting systems, and place in the universe. The course uncovers concepts and processes found in astronomy, geology, meteorology, and oceanography. Students will have the opportunity to evaluate and explore many scientific concepts by participating in interactive lab sessions, conducting hands-on activities, and completing projects designed to improve the understanding of Earth and its dynamic functions.

Biology

Biology is intended to expose students to the designs and patterns of living organisms that have been created by God. In preceding years, students should have developed a foundational understanding of life sciences. This biology course will expand upon that knowledge and incorporate more abstract knowledge. The student’s understanding should encompass both the micro and macro aspects of life and this biology course includes both. The major concepts covered are taxonomy, the chemical basis of life, cellular structure and function, genetics, microbiology, botany, human anatomy and physiology, and ecological principles.

Chemistry

Chemistry is intended to expose students to the designs and patterns in the world that God has created. In preceding years, students should have developed an understanding for the macroscopic properties of substances and been introduced to the microstructure of substances. This chemistry course will expand upon that knowledge, further develop the microstructure of substances, and teach the symbolic and mathematical world of formulas, equations, and symbols. The major concepts covered are measurement, atomic structure, chemical formulas and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gases, chemical equilibrium, and organic chemistry.

Integrated Physics & Chemistry

Integrated Physics and Chemistry is a physical science course designed for high school students needing an entry level science course covering basic concepts found in chemistry and physics. Topics included in this study are:  matter,  motion and forces,  work and energy,  electricity and magnetism, and  waves. Throughout the course, students will have opportunities to observe simulations, investigate ideas, and solve problems–both on screen and away from the computer.

Physics

Physics is intended to expose students to the design and order in the world that God has created. In preceding years, students should have developed a basic understanding of the macroscopic and microscopic world of forces, motion, waves, light, and electricity. The physics course will expand upon that prior knowledge and further develop both. The curriculum will also seek to teach the symbolic and mathematical world of formulas and symbols used in physics. The major concepts covered are kinematics, forces and motion, work and energy, sound and light waves, electricity and magnetism, and nuclear physics.  

 


Fine Arts and Technology

The Fine Arts Department at Tyler Street Christian Academy consists of visual arts and music, challenging students to explore their creativity. Our close knit environment allows faculty to work with students one on one as they develop and refine their artistic skills.

Handbells and Music Theory

This course is a full year fine arts elective for high school students. Students learn handbell basics and associated techniques including rhythm counts and dynamic markings which comprise a musical piece. The course requires no prior instrumental, vocal, or music theory study. Using the handbells as a visual basis for comprehension, the course materials explore the nature of music.  

Visual Arts

The visual arts course is a mixed study of artists and artistic styles. Using a variety of mediums such as paint, clay, and glass, students develop special projects to be presented at the annual ACSI (Association of Christian Schools International) Art Festival in the Spring.

Beginning Band

Beginning band is designed to provide students with an introductory experience with band instruments including  flute, oboe, clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, french horn, baritone, trombone, tuba, bass, and drums. Students are instructed in fundamental skills necessary in playing a musical instrument, the basics of music theory and recognizing basic fingering patterns and note names. Our band program is led in partnership with the Music Learning Company.

Intermediate Band

Intermediate band builds on skills taught in the Beginning Band course. Music reading is reinforced, tone quality is improved and additional scales are added. Students expand music styles to include Jazz, Blues, Pop. Students  have the chance to showcase their talents at the end of the semester for parents and peers. Our band program is led in partnership with the Music Learning Company.

 


Career and Technology

Through the Career and Technology Program at Tyler Street Christian Academy, students discover real world and real life skills which will will prepare them for our rapidly changing future. Students are exposed to various career paths and receive instruction in the skills necessary to pursue fields of interest such as science, technology, design and allied health. We desire to reflect our mission of encouraging students to love learning.

Career Explorations I

The Career Explorations I course is designed to give sixth and seventh grade students an opportunity to explore various career and technical education subjects. Specifically, students will be able to learn about careers involving human-related services. Each unit introduces one particular field and explains its past, present, and future. The goal is to introduce students to careers which they can further investigate as a high school student.

Career Explorations II

The Career Explorations 2 course is designed to give eighth grade students an opportunity to explore various career and technical education subjects. Students e learn about careers involving various technical fields from computers to agriculture. Each unit unfolds to explain the past, present, and future of individual fields. Students are further challenged to examine these careers as they prepare for high school.

Keyboarding and Applications

Keyboarding and Applications is a semester long course for sixth grade students that teaches students keyboarding skills, technical skills, effective communication skills, and productive work habits. In this course, students will learn about proper keyboarding technique. Once students have been introduced to keyboarding skills, lessons will include daily practice of those skills. Students will gain an understanding of computer hardware, operating systems, file management, and the Internet. In addition, they will apply their keyboarding skills and create a variety of business documents, including word processing documents and electronic presentations.

Office Applications I

Office Applications I explores the use of application skills in Microsoft® Word®, Publisher®, and PowerPoint® 2010. Students will use these applications to design, develop, create, edit, and share business documents, publications, and presentations.

Office Applications II

Office Applications II Office Applications II explores the use of application skills in Microsoft® Excel® and Microsoft® Access®. Students will use these applications to design, develop, create, edit, and share business spreadsheet and database documents.

Fundamentals of Computer Systems

The Computer Fundamentals course will provide students with an understanding of computers and how they operate as well as a basic understanding of how to manage and maintain computers and computer systems. These skills will provide students with the ability to configure computers and solve computer problems. Students will learn details about the different elements of computers and computer systems. They will learn to identify hardware devices and their functions. They will be instructed on the role of operating systems as well as how to install and customize the Windows operating system. Students will learn about networking and the Internet. They will also be introduced to security issues in order to protect themselves and their computers and data. Students will also learn about some of the software applications typically used on computers today, such as Microsoft Office. In addition, students will learn specifics about maintaining and troubleshooting computers, including managing files, backing up systems, and using the administrative tools in the Windows operating system. Lastly, the students will learn the basics of customer service and working as a help desk support technician.

Introduction to Information Technology

This course focuses on real-world application including common industry best practices and specific vendors that offer tools for technicians, project managers, and IT leadership. Students will continue to apply their knowledge of hardware and software components associated with IT systems while exploring a variety of careers related to IT support and services. Students will analyze technical support needs to perform customer service, perform configuration management activities, and evaluate application software packages and emerging software. Students will demonstrate and apply knowledge of IT analysis and design by initiating a system project and evaluating applications within the IT system. Information Technology is a dynamic discipline that is continuously evolving.

New Applications: Web Development in the 21st Century

New Applications introduces students to the rapidly evolving world of apps, or applications. This is a practical course in how to develop a presence on the World Wide Web using WordPress and other available web-application tools. The goal of the course is to provide the learner insight into the rapidly evolving universe of programming and application development so that he or she can make informed career decisions in an industry that is changing as quickly as it is growing.

Careers in Allied Health

This course focuses on select allied health careers. The course reviews education and/or training needed for each job, workplace environments and salaries. Within each job group, students will explore important aspects that are applicable to the entire field of allied health, such as behaving ethically, working as a team, keeping patients safe and free from infections and germs, honoring diverse needs of diverse patients, and following laws and policies. The course concludes with activities that allow students to seriously engage with their career exploration and selection.

Engineering and Design

Engineering and Design is part of the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) education and career path. By building real-world problem-solving and critical-thinking skills, students learn how to innovate and design new products and improve existing products. Students are introduced to the engineering design process to build new products and to the reverse engineering process, which enables engineers to adjust any existing product. Parallels and analogies from Scriptural examples will firmly seat the course in Bible truth, since God is the master engineer, designer, and creator of everything. Popular topics and issues that are politically controversial will be explored from a Biblical perspective.



We diversify the learning experience according to the needs of each student while equipping them with tools to be college and career ready. Our small class size lends itself to individual attention and deeper content exploration.

All secondary students use a hybrid learning program. Textbooks are digital and most coursework is completed online using the Ignitia curriculum through our 1:1 laptop program.

In addition to academics, we focus on character development, service to the community and the spiritual formation of our students. A variety of extracurricular activities and elective courses are available. Students are also sharpened in their spiritual growth through weekly chapel services. We desire for our students to be equipped to lead and grow into the calling God has for their life.